Interrupting the Continuity from School Bullying to Adverse Outcomes in Adult Life: Informing Intervention Research and Practice

Interrupting the Continuity from School Bullying to Adverse Outcomes in Adult Life: Informing Intervention Research and Practice

Maria TtofiMaria M. Ttofi, Ph.D.
Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge

November 18, 2013
11:30 a.m. - 12:45 p.m.
120 Clemens Hall | UB North Campus
Buffalo, NY

Longitudinal research has established a strong link between school bullying and adverse outcomes later in life. In a British Academy funded project, a series of interconnected systematic reviews and meta-analyses have shown that school bullying (perpetration and victimization) uniquely contributes to later offending and depression after taking into account pre-existing adjustment problems and other major childhood risk factors. Not all children involved in school bullying, however, go on to experience adjustment difficulties. Some children function better than would be expected given their involvement in school bullying and do not follow, for example, a criminal career path later in life. Various questions subsequently arise: What factors interrupt the continuity from school bullying to later adverse outcomes? What factors enable children involved in school bullying to regulate their behaviour and to lead normal well-adjusted lives in the long run? These questions are addressed based on an ongoing Jacobs Foundation and Newton Trust funded project on protective factors and school bullying. Implications arising from the project research findings for future intervention research, policy and practice are explained.

Presentation Materials

PowerPoint Presentation

November 18, 2013


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