Catherine P. Cook-Cottone

Associate Professor
Licensed Psychologist/Certified School Psychologist
Certified and Registered Yoga Instructor

Counseling, School, and Educational Psychology

 424 Baldy Hall
 716-645-1128
  716-645-6616
 cpcook@buffalo.edu
  http://theyogabag.blogspot.com/


Embodied Self-Regulation and Self-Care
Eating Disorders
Yoga and Mindfulness
Psychosocial Disorders
Mindfulness and Yoga for Health and Healing
Counseling with Children and Adolescents
Eating Disorders/Psychosocial Disorders
Embodied Self-Regulation

Jump to Publications

Educational Background

  • Ph.D., Counseling/School Psychology, APA Accredited, University at Buffalo, 1997
  • M.S., School Psychology, State University of New York at Oswego, 1993
  • B.S., Pre-professional Psychology, Utica College of Syracuse University, 1989

Licensure and Certification

  • Certified School Psychologist
  • New York State Licensed Psychologist
  • Certified and Registered Yoga Instructor

Current Courses

  • CEP 644 - Counseling with Children and Adolescents
  • CEP 689- Yoga for Health and Healing
  • CEP 611- The Mindful Therapist
  • CEP 624- Eating Disorders: Prevention and Treatment
  • CEP 672 - History and Systems in Psychology

Catherine Cook-Cottone, Ph.D., is a Licensed Psychologist and Certified School Psychologist and a Certified and Registered Yoga Instructor. She is an associate professor in the Department of Counseling, School, and Educational Psychology at SUNY at Buffalo. Dr. Cook-Cottone researches embodied self-regulation and psychosocial disorders. Aligned with her research, she teaches classes in counseling with children and adolescents, yoga, mindfulness interventions, eating disorders, and history of psychology.

She also maintains a private practice. Working with adults, adolescents, and children, she specializes in the assessment and treatment of: anxiety-based disorders (e.g., PTSD and Generalized Anxiety Disorder), eating disorders (including other disorders of self-care), and development of emotional regulation skills. She specializes in constructivist therapies that facilitate neurological, emotional, and dialectic integration including narrative, bibliotherapeutic, and creative approaches. She teaches yoga at Power Yoga Buffalo.

Jump to a section on this page
[Self-Regulation and Eating Disorders] [Doctoral Student Work] [Graduates] [Latest Books]

Research Overview

Catherine's research has two general focus areas: (a) Embodied Self-Regulation and Psychosocial Disorders (see further details below), and (b) School-Based Projects (i.e., projects completed in areas of reading, teaching, and student development according to student interests)

Embodied Self-Regulation and Psychosocial Disorders

Embodied Self-Regulation is defined as the regulation of self through embodied practices (e.g., yoga and mindful practices). Emodied self-regulation is an effective tool in the prevention and treatment of psychosocial disorders. Dr. Cook-Cottone conceptualizes these relationships within a Attunement Model of Wellness and Embodied Self-Regulation (see Figure 1 below). Interventions utilize strategies that include instruction in the areas of yoga, mindfullness-based techniques, and psycho-education in functional neuro-anatomy.

Catherine's wellness research focuses on the exploration and validation of the Attunement Model of Wellness and Embodied Self-Regulation (see Figure 1 below). The self is viewed as an integration of thoughts, emotions, and physiological needs within the context of the external ecologies of family, community and culture. A healthy self develops when an individual embodies practices that promote health and growth and the external ecologies are attuned with and support these practices (or the individual has learned tools to self-regulate despite external ecologies).

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Citation for the model:Cook-Cottone, C. (2006). The attuned representation model for the primary prevention of eating disorders: An overview for school psychologists. Psychology In The Schools, 43(2), 223-230.

The model is well explicated in places (1) Cook-Cottone (2006), "The attuned representation model for the primary prevention of eating disorders: An overview for school psychologists," published in Psychology in the Schools (PITS), (2) Healthy Eating in Schools: Evidenced Based Strategies to Help Kids Thrive Buy on Amazon Here, (3) Girls Growing in Wellness and Balance: Yoga and Life Skills to Empower Buy on Amazon Here, and (4) Mindfulness and yoga for self-regulation: A primer for mental health professionals Mindfulness and Yoga .

The Attunement Model of Wellness and Embodied Self-Regulation is an interactive model of two systems: the self system and the cultural system (see Figure 1).

The self system is made up of three potentially integrated and transactive components that co-evolve throughout an individual’s development: (a) the physiological self (i.e., body), (b) emotional self (i.e., feeling), and (c) cognitive self (i.e., thinking). The self system is an internal system experienced by the individual as his or her Real Self.

The external system is modeled after Bronfenbrenner’s ecological model (1979) and is also made up of three potentially integrated and transactional systems: (a) the microsystem (e.g., family), (b) exosystem (e.g., community), and (c) the macrosystem (e.g., culture).

The two systems are interconnected by a process: attunement. Based on Siegel’s (1999) theoretical work, attunement is defined as a reciprocal process of mutual influence and coregulation. Internal system (i.e., Real Self) and external system attunement is facilitated by the Representational Self. The Representational Self is the constructed self that is presented to the external system. It is the way individuals engage with their environment; how they interact with their families, people at their schools, and individuals in their communities.” (Cook-Cottone, 2006, PITS).

You can read more about how this model was implemented here Satsanga or in either of the two books listed below. The model may serve to help researchers and practitioners understand a variety of adaptive and maladaptive behavioral responses and/or choices including: trauma and adaptation, self-concept development, addictions and abuse behaviors, as well as self-mutilation.

GETTING TO ATTUNEMENT AND INTEGRATION:

The Mindful Self-Care Scale (MSCS)

Citation for the Mindful Self-Care Scale- SHORT:

Cook-Cottone, C. P. & Guyker, W. (2016, manuscript in preparation). The Mindful Self-Care Scale: Mindful self-care as a tool to promote physical, emotional, and cognitive well-being]

The Mindful Self-Care Scale- SHORT (MSCS, 2016) is a 33-item scale that measures the self-reported frequency of behaviors that measure self-care behavior. These scales are the result of an Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) of a large community sample. The subscales are positively correlated with body esteem and negative correlated with substance use and eating disordered behavior. Please check back for the published citation. Note: there are an additional six clinical questions and two general questions for a total of 42 items. (Note, the long-form has 84 questions and 10 subscales. It can be found on Dr. Catherine Cook-Cottone’s faculty web page- below).

Short write up of the MSCS- short psychometrics (check back for full paper)
Short MSCS Psychometric write-uo

Citation for the Mindful Self-Care Scale- LONG:

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2014). The Mindful Self-Care Scale: Self-care as a tool to promote physical, emotional, and cognitive well-being. Retrieved from http://gse.buffalo.edu/about/directory/faculty/cook-cottone

The Mindful Self-Care Scale- LONG (MSCS, 2014) is an 84-item scale that measures the self-reported frequency of behaviors that measure self-care behavior.

Self-care is defined as the daily process of being aware of and attending to one’s basic physiological and emotional needs including the shaping of ones daily routine, relationships, and environment as needed to promote self-care.

Self-care is seen as the foundational work required for physical and emotional well-being. Self-care is associated with positive physical health, emotional well-being, and mental health. Steady and intentional practice of self-care is seen as protective by preventing the onset of mental health symptoms, job/school burnout, and improving work and school productivity.

This scale is intended to help individuals identify areas of strength and weakness in self-care behavior as well as assess interventions that serve to improve self-care. The scale addresses 10 domains of self-care: nutrition/hydration, exercise, soothing strategies, self-awareness/mindfulness, rest, relationships, physical and medical practices, environmental factors, self-compassion, and spiritual practices. There are also three general items assessing the individual’s general or more global practices of self-care.

Brief Childhood Eating Concerns Risk Assessment

(Cook-Cottone, 2014)

For a brief eating concerns risk assessment please click on this link. Brief Eating Concerns Assessment

Citation for Brief Eating Concerns Assessment:

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2014). Brief Eating Concerns Risk Assessment. Presented at the National Association for School Psychologists Annual Convention as part of the Health Eating in School Miniskills Workshop: Washington DC.

More assessments available in
Healthy Eating in Schools

Latest Books

Mindfulness and yoga in schools: A guide for teachers and practitioners

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This is the first research-based text intended to help teachers and practitioners implement mindfulness and yoga programs in schools. A complete review of the literature on mindfulness and yoga interventions is provided along with detailed steps on how to implement such programs. Training requirements, classroom set-up, trauma-sensitive practices, and existing quality programs are reviewed. Twelve core principles of mindfulness and yoga in schools are woven throughout for the utmost in continuity. As a whole, the book provides tools for enhancing classroom and school practices as well as personal well-being. It is distinguished by its emphasis on research, translation of research into practice, and insight into potential roadblocks when using mindfulness and yoga in schools.

Part I reviews the conceptual model for embodied self-regulation and the risks associated with a lack of self-regulation, an intervention model used in education, and tips for implementing mindfulness and yogic practices within this approach. Parts II and III review the philosophical underpinnings of mindfulness and yoga and critically review the mindfulness and yoga protocols and interventions implemented in schools. Part IV addresses mindful self-care for students and teachers, including a scale for establishing self-care goals and a scoring system.

Mindfulness and yoga for self-regulation: A primer for mental health professionals

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Buy on Amazon.com

The first book to present mindfulness and yoga-based treatment for dysregulated, consumption-oriented disorders

Mindfulness and yoga-based approaches as beneficial supplements to traditional mental health paradigms are well supported by empirical research. While numerous texts have examined these approaches for treatment of depression, anxiety, and eating disorders, this is the first to address mindfulness and yoga-based approaches as embodied tools for reducing dysregulation associated with self-destructive and consumption-oriented behaviors. Introducing the basic theoretical foundations, key practices, and comprehensive protocols of mindfulness and yoga-based approaches for the treatment of externally oriented behaviors, the text is targeted at mental health professionals who wish to learn how to incorporate these techniques into their practice.

The book explores the societal influences that lead to the externally oriented, idealized, and ultimately self-defeating concept of the individual. It provides the structure and practical applications for clinicians to help their clients overcome struggles with externally oriented behaviors and discover an internal sense of satisfaction and peace of mind. Tapping into the concept of a "hungry self" within the context of consumerism, the book advocates mindfulness and yoga approaches as alternate pathways toward a contented, regulated, and authentic experience of self. It addresses various aspects of the consumptive self and defines related syndromes such as disordered eating, compulsive shopping, substance use, and gambling. Creating a context for using alternative and complementary approaches, the book describes the challenges of traditional therapies. It then covers the conceptual aspects of mindfulness and yoga and describes specific protocols that facilitate behaviors associated a healthy experience of the self for a variety of disorders.

Key Features:

Describes mindfulness and yoga approaches as an effective treatment for a range of consumption and self-regulation issues-the first book of its kind

Explains how to integrate mindfulness and yoga with traditional mental health paradigms for maximum benefits

Designed for clinicians with minimal background in yoga or mindfulness

Combines a conceptual overview of embodied self-regulation with practical techniques

Reviews treatment protocols informed by mindfulness and yoga practices covering their evidence base and contraindications for use

Healthy Eating in Schools (Cook-Cottone, Tylka, & Tribole, 2013)

Healthy Eating in Schools

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School-based interventions that target obesity in children often have little positive effect and may inadvertently contribute to unhealthy behaviors in the attempt to lose weight. This book provides a conceptual model for understanding both obesity and eating disordered behaviors. Specifically, it advocates for body acceptance and intuitive eating a flexible, healthy eating behavior involving awareness of the body s hunger and satiety cues. Within this context, the chapters review evidence-based school interventions in nutrition, self-regulation, exercise, body acceptance, media literacy, and mindfulness. Guidance is also provided for identifying, referring, and supporting students with emerging eating disorders.

Girls Growing in Wellness and Balance: Yoga and Life Skills to Empower (Cook-Cottone, Kane, Keddie, & Haugli, 2013)

Girls Growing in Wellness and Balance

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This is the first published counseling prevention program to use yoga as one of the primary methods for promoting health and wellness among developing girls. This program is designed to teach girls how to live healthy and balanced lives that nurture the whole self by learning how to problem solve with both thoughts and feelings. Over the course of 10 years, the authors developed and refined this program in schools, after-school programs, yoga studios, and summer programs. Based on an adapted, preventative form of cognitive-behavioral and dialectic behavioral therapy for youth, this program is composed of 14 easy-to-follow, group sessions that integrate ideas, activities, and yoga for girls ages 9 - 18. Yoga is an important part of this program for developing children and adolescents because yoga practices promote psychological health by teaching coping skills and self-regulation. The manual has detailed descriptions of the yoga poses, and the CD-ROM includes photos that illustrate each pose and participant worksheets.

Elements of Counseling Children and Adolescents (Cook-Cottone, Kane, & Anderson, 2013)

Buy at Springer

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"Offers precise, practical guidance based on a proven teaching format."

Tailored to the specific needs of the child and adolescent client, this concise, easy-to-read primer provides essential and practical guidelines for counselors and psychologists who are training to work with children in both clinical and school settings. It is modeled after the highly successful and time-tested "Elements of... " format used in many teaching disciplines. The book distills the basic concepts that beginning professionals must keep in mind as they approach practice, offering guidance in logical, numbered sequence from setting the stage for the counseling process through the essentials of building and maintaining an active counseling practice.

Not only does the book facilitate learning with its precise, easily digestible rules and principles, it provides potent guidance for both common and particularly troubling situations. Throughout the text, each concept is addressed first as it applies to children and then to adolescents. Key features such as using developmentally appropriate language and activities and fostering growth and self-reflection are covered, along with critical issues such as collaborating with parents and other professionals, responding to crisis situations, misconceptions and assumptions that can hinder therapy, and counselor self-awareness and care. The book discusses a variety of interventions and techniques that are most effective in work with young clients. Case examples of client-counselor dialogues in each chapter illustrate foundational concepts, and information is supported by references to empirical and theoretical works. The book also includes an overview of how to use the text for transcript analysis in training programs. Written by experienced counseling and therapy professionals, this versatile text will be a welcome addition for courses specific to counseling children and adolescents as well as other courses across the curriculum in school counseling; school psychology; marriage, child, and family counseling; and clinical social work. An instructor's guide includes sample syllabus, activities, and ideas for student self-evaluation.

Key Features:

  • Distills the essential components of therapy and counseling with children and adolescents in a highly useful, time-tested "Elements of... " format
  • Delivers short, essential text specific to child/adolescent counseling
  • Adaptable to a range of counseling-related courses across the curriculum
  • Provides illustrative examples of counselor-client dialogues
  • Includes instructor's guide

The Yoga Bag: Catherine's Blog about Embodied Self-Regulation

The Yoga Bag
Read about Dr. Catherine Cook-Cottone's perspectives on embodied self-regulation (through the eyes of Zuri) and research (including photos of our trip to Niarobi, Kenya to study the Africa Yoga Project).

The Yoga Bag Blog

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Read About Our Trip to Africa

Research Blogs on Africa

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Doctoral Student Work and Graduates

A note from Dr. Cook-Cottone about her research team and supervisees:

I began at UB in 2002. From that point to this date, I have enjoyed my work with my research team and supervisees tremendously. Over the years, I have had the opportunity to work with extremely bright and passionate individuals. We have done work here in Buffalo and we have traveled as far as Africa. I am grateful every day for this opportunity; an opportunity that is-- by far-- the most rewarding and meaningful part of my work.

As each doctoral student graduates it is a tradition to give them an annotated copy of "Oh, The Places You'll Go!" by Dr. Suess.

"And will you succeed?
Yes! You will indeed!
(98 and 1/2 percent guaranteed.)
KID, YOU'LL MOVE MOUNTAINS!"

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Here are the amazing students on, and graduates of, my research team. As you read, you will see why I feel the way I do.

Jessalyn Klein- Jessalyn is interested in the treatment of eating and mood disorders with a combined approach that supplements traditional talk therapies with yoga and training in mind-body awareness. Her hope is that addressing both the mental and physical aspects of psychopathology will improve recovery time and help individuals maintain progress. She would also like to explore the utility of such holistic methods in health promotion programs for people of all ages. Jessalyn applied concept mapping to study the effects of the Africa Yoga Project in Nairobi, Kenya for her dissertation. The Africa Yoga Project

Amy Fish – Amy Fish is a doctoral student in the CP/SP program. She is studying body image, self-care, and eating issues among Native Americans. Her research explores association among key variables among Native Americans.

Kelly Norman – Kelly Norman is a doctoral student in the CP/SP program. Kelly's overall passion is helping individuals learn how to be empowered as self advocates in their pursuit of physical and mental health. She is interested in eating disorder prevention. Her qualifying paper research explored interpersonal personality style as a factor in the effective prevention of mental illness among middle school females. Her dissertation will explore the associations between interpersonal style and eating disorder risk factors.

Itzel Iorduna – Itzel Iorduna is a doctoral student in the CP/SP doctoral program. Her qualifying paper will look at emotional priming and food choice among individuals with eating disordered behavior.

Michelle Serwacki Michelle’s current research interests relate to the integration of health promotion and positive psychology within an educational framework. She would like to explore the use of strategies that focus on strengthening mind-body awareness to help improve the psychosocial and physical health of children and adolescents. Additionally, she is also interested in studying the internal and external correlates of eating disordered behaviors and how these relate to the efficacy of eating disorder treatment and prevention programs.

Carla Giambrone Carla applied concept mapping to study the effects of the Africa Yoga Project in Nairobi, Kenya for her qualifying paper and dissertation. She is a certified English and reading teacher and coach. Her teaching integrates yoga and mindfulness based practices with cognitive constructionist therapies. Her purpose is to travel the world teaching women of all cultures toward informed choice and personal empowerment. The Africa Yoga Project

Erga Lemish Erga is a first year doctoral student in the Counseling Psychology program. Erga was born and raised in Israel. She completed her B.A. in Psychology (Major) and Philosophy (Minor) from Southern Illinois University Carbondale in May 2014. Erga is interested in processes of Embodied Self Regulation as related, primarily, to Eating Disorders and Anxiety Disorders, and the incorporation of Yoga and Mindfulness based techniques in the prevention and treatment of these, and other, disorders. Her research interests include the relationship between eating disorders and active engagement in small-scale farming and outdoor activities, as well as eating disordered behavior on social media.

Graduates

Dr. Emily Keddie – Emily studied prevention research within the school setting, with particular interests in the anxiety and eating disorders. Her qualifying paper was part of a large scale project exploring issues such as anxiety, self-care, self-compassion, and bullying within the middle school population. Her dissertation addressed the effectiveness of the Girls Growing in Wellness and Balance project, which is a manualized prevention program for fifth grade girls. This project utilizes yoga, empowerment content, and media literacy to prevent the onset of mental illness among middle school females. Emily was a co-author on the publication of the program manual titled Girls Growing in Wellness and Balance: Yoga and Life Skills to Empower, available now. Emily is working at Women and Children's Hospital at Buffalo, which includes work at the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Clinic, Buffalo Centre for the Treatment of Eating Disorders, and Department of Oncology and Hematology.

Dr. Sara Haugli – Sara's qualifying paper explored the effectiveness of the Girls Growing in Wellness and Balance program among minority students (see list of publications below). Sara was a co-author on the publication of the program manual titled Girls Growing in Wellness and Balance: Yoga and Life Skills to Empower, available now. Her dissertation explored the PAT-2, a tool that assesses social support in families of children that have been diagnosed with cancer. She is currently working in the schools.

Dr. Amanda Smith – Amanda Smith completed her undergraduate and Master degrees at Ithaca College in Exercise and Sport Sciences. Her current research interests involve the study of eating disorders in children and adolescents. Her dissertation project focused on the examination of social neuroscience and neuropsychological correlates at play in the etiology and development Anorexia Nervosa. Specifically, Amanda investigated the role interpersonal factors, such as empathy, in the pervasive and treatment resistant nature of this disorder.

Dr. Lakaii Jones – Lakaii is a doctoral student from Detroit, MI. She is very interested in understudied populations and eating disorder risk and behaviors. Both her qualifying paper as well as her dissertation explore the interrelationships among media identification, race identification, culture, and eating disorder behaviors and attitudes. She is especially interested in minority youth in disadvantaged urban populations and media and cultural influences of eating disorders and body image perception in minority girls, specifically African-Americans. She is particularly interested in Binge Eating Disorder in this population. Her qualifying paper was published in Eating Disorders: The Journal of Treatment and Prevention and involves a matched-sample repeated measures study of minority and Caucasian girls. Her dissertation addresses media and cultural influences of eating behavior in African-American girls. I am also interested in pediatric neuropsychology and have an emerging research interest in traumatic brain injury in children.

Dr. Jennifer Piccolo – Jennifer worked on several projects. Her qualifying paper focused on reading pedagogy: Pedagogical practices related to reading instruction and school psychology candidates. The protocol involved completion of a survey of current pedagogical practices related to reading instruction and school psychology candidates. Jennifer’s dissertation was on disclosure experiences among LGBTQ students. She hopes that this information will help to inform a best-practices model for the provision of effective resources, policies, and support for LGBTQ high school students. Jennifer is a psychologist at Baker Victory Services.

Dr. Melinda Cruz – Melinda collected data on a project that is titled Self Concept and learning disability: Developmental, process, and knowledge implications of sharing diagnostic information with the child or adolescent. The purpose of this study was to inform practice in school psychology of a best-practices model for the disclosure of diagnostic information to the child or adolescent upon diagnosis with a learning disability. As there is no research in this area, our study began with a retrospective survey of college students diagnosed with a learning disability. The survey included a measure of multi-dimensional self-concept.

Dr. Sarah Rowland – Sarah is very interested in the assessment of eating disordered behavior. Her qualifying paper explored the poor floor issue regarding the measurement of eating disordered behaviors in prevention programs (paper submitted for review). Sarah’s dissertation was a qualitative investigation of contagion as etiology among individuals diagnosed with an eating disorder. Sarah works for Buffalo City Schools.

Dr. Carolyn Andolina Casey – Carolyn's work is multifaceted. She is particularly interest in prevention programs within the schools. Her qualifying paper focused on the factors that make-up a quality obesity prevention program. Her dissertation explored the effectiveness of a early reading program (Magic Penny). Carolyn works for Pittsord Schools near Rochester, NY.

Dr. Meredith Beck – Molly's research focused on the efficacy of our eating disorder treatment programs administered with females at both the clinical and sub-clinical level of eating disorder symptomatology. Her qualifying paper analyzed the pre and posttest measures of an aggregate set of female participants who have completed the yoga and wellness treatment groups. Her dissertation will be evaluated, in more detail and with a larger aggregate of participants, the efficacy of the treatment groups. As a result of her work here at UB, she has published in the journal Child and Adolescent Mental Health and The Journal for Specialists in Group Work. Meredith has a private practice in Buffalo, NY. Please see her web page at http://www.meredithbeckjolsyn.vpweb.com or call her at (716) 332-6610 for an appointment,

Dr. Christine Berry – Christine completed her qualifying paper on the efficacy of a Reading Recovery program in a poor rural school district. She successfully defended her dissertation on bullying and victimization in a residential treatment setting (4/2006). We are working now to get both projects published, while Dr. Berry teaches at Canisius College.

Dr. Melinda Scime – Mindy has had a very productive time here at SUNY at Buffalo. Her work has focused on the prevention of eating disorders in school-aged females. She published her qualifying paper (Scime, M., Cook-Cottone, C. P., Kane, L., & Watson, T. (2006). Primary prevention of eating disorders: Innovative practices in positive psychology and wellness. Eating Disorders, 14, 143-155). Her latest publication (her dissertation) was in the International Journal of Eating Disorders, as well as two other publications and many presentations. Dr. Scime worked in the city of Buffalo helping children within the scope of Dr. Pellham's work. Dr. Scime now owns her own yoga studio and is in private practice. Please see her web page at http://livingwellnessofniagara.com/index.html or call her at the Tree of Life Yoga Studio at 716.949.5606.

Dr. Kristen Tarquin – Kristen collected data on student alienation and trauma and self-concept. The purpose of this study was to expand the current knowledge of students' victimization by both educators and peers, and to explore the nature and extent of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) caused by student victimization. The data collection at the University at Buffalo was part of a larger study that was being conducted by Dr. Irwin Hyman of Temple University and the National Center for the Study of Corporal Punishment and Alternatives. In addition, we were exploring the relationship between students' alienation and the development of their self concept. Her work has been accepted for publication — Tarquin, K., & Cook-Cottone, C. P. (in press). Relationships among Aspects of Student Alienation and Self Concept. School Psychology Quarterly.

Dr. Stephanie Grella – Dr. Stephanie Grella received a M.A. degree in School Psychology from Marist College, and she has worked as a School Psychologist at Gateway-Longview. Her qualifying paper tilted, Tier 2 Reading Intervention and the Construction of Neuropsychologically Different Groups of Learners, investigated the measurable neuropsychological distinctions among at-risk readers, which was presented at the APA annual convention in 2010. Her primary research interest focuses on the prevention of eating disorders and substance abuse in adolescent females. Stephanie’s dissertation focused on the discrete personality traits associated with disordered eating and substance use in a college population. In particular, she examined factors related to emotional intelligence as potential mediating variables that impact the relationship among personality traits and these disorders.

Dr. Tatyana Sapaleva – Dr. Tatyana Saplaleva- Raby completed her undergraduate studies at Niagara University where she earned a double degree in biology and psychology. Her current interests include health behavior, positive psychology and prevention of mental illness. As part of her dissertation research, Tatyana devised a prevention program for parents of preteen girls at risk for developing an eating disorder. The program included four workshops covering topics like effective communication within the family and the physical and psychological development during the preteen years.



Books/Monographs

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2009). Success at any cost? School-based prevention of high risk, body-change strategies: Eating Disorders, Steroid Abuse, and Excessive Exercise. Buffalo, NY: GSE Publications/SUNY Press.

Cook-Cottone, C.P., Tribole, & E., Tylka, T. (2013). Healthy eating and body acceptance: Cultivating a positive school environment. Washington, DC:
American Psychological Association.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., Kane, L., Keddie, E., & Haugli, S. (2013). Girls growing in wellness and balance: Yoga and life skills to empower. Stoddard, WI: Schoolhouse Educational Services, LLC.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., Kane, L., & Anderson, L. (2015). Elements of counseling children and adolescents. Springer Publishing.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2015). Mindfulness and yoga for embodied self-regulation: A primer for mental health professionals. Springer Publishing.

For CV dated 1.2016 click here:

Book Chapters

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2013). Case Studies in Eating Disorders. In A. S. Davis (Ed.), Handbook of pediatric neuropsychology. (pp.). New York, NY: Springer Publishing.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., Smith, A., & Grella, S. (2013). Training Issues in Adolescent Health. In W. O'Donohue, L. Benuto, & L. Woodward Tolle (Eds.). Adolescent Health
Psychology. New York, NY: Springer.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Smith, A. (2013). Neuropsychology of Eating Disorders. In C. Noggle (Ed.). Neuropsychological Impact of Psychopathology. New York, NY: Springer
Publishing.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2012). Life-Story Work. In R. J. R. Levesque (Ed.) Encyclopedia of Adolescence. New York, NY: Springer Publishing.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2012). Self-Care and Eating Issues. In T. Fitch & J. Marshall (Eds.). Group work and outreach guide for college counselors: Group Plans and Resources. American Counseling Association.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2010). Eating Disorders. In A. S. Davis (Ed.), Handbook of pediatric neuropsychology. (pp. 613-629). New York, NY: Springer Publishing.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2010). Prevention and intervention of eating disorders. In P. McCabe & S. R. Shaw (Eds.). Current topics in pediatrics in the schools. (pp. 113-
121). Bethesda, MD: NASP Publications.

Chen, R. Sharman, R., Rao, H. R., Upadhyaya, S. J., & Cook-Cottone, C. P., (2009). Coordination of emergency response: An examination of the roles of people, process, and information technology. In M. Turoff, R. Hiltz, B. Van de Walle (Eds.), Information Systems for Emergency Management. Armonk, New York. M E Sharpe.

Cook-Cottone (2009). The neuropsychology of eating disorders in women. In E. Fletcher-Janzen (Ed.), Neuropsychology of women (175-207). New York, NY: Springer Publishing.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Phelps, L. (2006). Adolescent eating disorders. In G. G Bear & K. M. Minke (Eds.), Children's Needs III. (pp. 977-988). Bethesda, MD: NASP Publications [chapter was selected for publication in the 2007 School-based mental health toolkit. Bethesda, MD: NASP Publications].

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2001). The assessment of children with severe disabilities. In J.A. Bondurandt- Utz (Ed.), A practical guide to infant and preschool assessment in special education. (pp. 136- 170). Needham, MA: Allyn & Bacon.

Refereed Journal Articles by Research Area

Intervention of Psychosocial Disorders

Cook-Cottone, & Gitman, K (submitted). The foster child in transition: The de-nested ecological Model.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2013). Dosage as a critical variable in yoga research. International Journal of Yoga Therapy.

Klein, J., & Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2013). A systematic review of yoga for the treatment of eating disorders. International Journal of Yoga Therapy.

Jones, L. A., & Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2013). Media and Cultural Influences in African American Girls' Eating Disorder Risk for Eating Disorders. Preventative
Medicine. Article ID 319701, 8 pages.

Serwacki, M., & Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2012). Yoga in the schools: A systematic review of the literature. International Journal of Yoga Therapy, 22, 101-109.

Casey, C., Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Beck-Josslyn, M. (2012). An overview of problematic eating and food-related behavior among foster children: Definitions, etiology, and intervention. Journal of Child and Adolescent Social Work, 29, 307-322.

Kim, M., Roa, R., Sharman, R., Uhadya, S., & Cook-Cottone. C. P. (2012). Assessing roles of people, technology, and structure in emergency management systems: A public sector perspective. Behavior and Information Technology.

Smith, A., & Cook-Cottone, C/ P. (2011). A Review of the Theoretical and Empirical Facets of Family Therapy as an Effective Intervention for Anorexia Nervosa in Adolescents. Journal of Clinical Psychology in Medical Settings, 18, 323-334.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., Jones, L. A., & Haugli, S. (2010). Prevention of Eating Disorders among Minority Youth: A Matched-Sample Repeated Measures Study. Eating Disorders, 18, 361-376.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2009). Eating disorders in childhood: Prevention and treatment supports. Childhood Education, 85, 300-306.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., Casey, C., Feeley, T. & Boran, J. (2009). A meta-analytic review of the prevention of childhood obesity in the schools. Psychology in the Schools, 46, 695-719. [Article included in DARE (The Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects). DARE is a collection of quality assessed systematic reviews of healthcare research identified in the biomedical literature.]

Tarquin, K., & Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2008). Relationships among aspects of student alienation and self concept. School Psychology Quarterly, 23, 16-25.

Scime, M., & Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2008). Primary prevention of eating disorders: A constructivist integration of mind and body strategies. International Journal of Eating Disorders, 41, 134-142.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., Beck, M., & Kane, L. (2008). Manualized-group treatment of eating disorders: Attunement in mind, body, and relationship (AMBR). The Journal for
Specialists in Group Work, 33, 61-83.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Beck, M (2007). A model for life-story work: Facilitating the construction of personal narrative for foster children. Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 12, 193-195.

Scime, M., Cook-Cottone, C. P., Kane, L., & Watson, T. (2006). Primary prevention of eating disorders: Innovative practices in positive psychology and wellness. Eating Disorders, 14, 143-155.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2006). The attuned representation model for the primary prevention of eating disorders: An overview for school psychologists. Psychology in the Schools, 43, 223-230.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2004). Using Piaget's theory of cognitive development to understand the construction of healing narratives. Journal of College Counseling, 7, 177-186.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2004). Childhood posttraumatic stress disorder: Symptomatology, treatment, and school reintegration. School Psychology Review, 33, 127-139 [selected for publication in the 2007 School-based mental health toolkit. Bethesda, MD: NASP Publications].

Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Phelps, L. (2003). Protective and risk factors related to body dissatisfaction in college females, Journal of College Counseling, 6, 80-89.

School-based Research with Students

Dutt-Doner, K. M., Cook-Cottone, C., & Allen, S. (2007). Improving classroom instruction: Understanding the developmental nature of analyzing primary sources. Middle Level Education Research Annual, 57-76.

Volker, M. A., Lopata, C., & Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2006). The assessment of children with intellectual giftedness and reading disabilities. Psychology in the Schools, 43, 855-869.

Dutt-Doner, K. M., Rech-Rockwell, M., Cook-Cottone, C., & Allen, S. (2006). Nurturing the historical thinker: A developmentally-based model for the use of document-based questions. Southern Social Studies Journal, 32, 29-67.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., Dutt-Doner, K., & Schoen, D. (2005). Understanding student article retrieval behaviors. Research Strategies, 20, 379-388.

Augustyniak, K., Cook-Cottone C., & Calabrese, N. (2004). The predictive validity of the Phelps Kindergarten Readiness Scale. Psychology in the Schools, 41, 509-516.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2004). Constructivism in family literacy practices: Parents as mentors. Reading Improvement, 41, 208-216.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2004). Exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs): Implications for school psychologists. Psychology in the Schools, 41, 709-723.

Lopata, C., & Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2003). Sampling bias: Full-text online databases and article selection Behavior. The Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, 3, 31-42.

Other (Teaching Development)

Sullivan, R., Collins, J., Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Robinson, J. (2004-2005). Technology and new directions in professional development: Applications of digital video, peer review, and self-reflection. Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 33, 131-146.

Foote, C. F., & Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2004). Field experiences in high-need urban settings: Analysis of current practice and insights for change. The Urban Review, 36, 189-210.

Other Publications

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2010). Review of The Category Test. In R. A. Spies & B. S. Plake (Eds.), Mental Measurements Yearbook. Lincoln, Nebraska: The University of Nebraska Press.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Beck, M (2007). Lifebook: A curriculum for the development of emotional regulation and narrative development in foster children. Child workbook and worker manuals for the mandated NYS training for human services employees in the child welfare system for the Office of Children and Families under the direction of Commissioner Gladys Carrion, Governor Spitzer's Office.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Scime, M. (2006). The prevention and treatment of eating disorders: An overview for school psychologists. The Communiqué, 34, 38-40.

Keca, J. & Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2005). Eating disorders: Prevention is worth every ounce. Principal Leadership, May, 11-15,

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2005). Helping hurricane victims (students) get back to normal. Education Update, 11, 19-21.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Meier, S. (2005). Review of The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test. In R. A. Spies & B. S. Plake (Eds.), The Sixteenth Mental Measurements Yearbook. (pp. 600-602). Lincoln, Nebraska: The University of Nebraska Press.

Dutt-Doner, K., Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Allen, S. (2007). Improving classroom instruction: Understanding the developmental nature of analyzing primary sources. The Journal of Research in Middle Level Education Online, 30, 1-20.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Piccolo, J. (2005). Review of the Test of Phonological Awareness Skills. In R. A. Spies & B. S. Plake (Eds.), The Sixteenth Mental Measurements Yearbook. (pp.1053-1055). Lincoln, Nebraska: The University of Nebraska Press.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Piccolo, J. (2005). Review of the Michigan English Language Institute College English Test- Listening. In R. A. Spies & B. S. Plake (Eds.), The Sixteenth Mental Measurements Yearbook. (pp. 624-626). Lincoln, Nebraska: The University of Nebraska Press.


Grants

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2006-2007). A multi-site study of a wellness program for the prevention and treatment of eating disorders. Dr. Nuala McGann Drescher Leave Grant Program. Funded $3,360 by United University Professions Affirmative Action/Diversity Committee.

Rao, H.R., Sharman, R., Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Upadhyaya, S. (2006-2007). The October 2006 Federal Disaster in Buffalo, NY: An Investigation of First and Second Responder Operations. Funded $29,977 by the National Science Foundation, SGER.

Rao, H.R., Sharman, R., Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Upadhyaya, S. (2006). Analyzing Emergency Response Management Systems in the Context of the Katrina and Rita Disasters-A First Responder Focus. Funded $22,082 from UB 2020 Interdisciplinary Research Development Fund.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2004). A naturalistic study of the implementation of Reading Recovery in a poor, rural school district (continued data collection and analysis). Funded $3,000 from Reading Recovery Council of North America.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2003). Digital peer review of practical school psychology and counseling skills: Counseling, consultation, and/or assessment. Funded $6,000 Educational Technology Center, University at Buffalo, SUNY.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2003). A naturalistic study of the implementation of Reading Recovery in a poor, rural school district. Funded $5,000 Reading Recovery Council of North America.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2003). A naturalistic study of the implementation of Reading Recovery in a poor, rural school district. Funded $5,000 Graduate School of Education. University at Buffalo, SUNY.

Cook-Cottone, Scime, M., Kane, L., & Watson, T. (2003). The effectiveness of use of constructivist strategies in the group prevention of eating disorders. Funded $2,500 Graduate School of Education. University at Buffalo, SUNY.

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2000). Community and Families Together: The West Side Family Literacy Program Grant Proposal Integrated D'Youville College and School #3. Funded $20,000 the Buffalo and New York State Mayors' Initiative Fund.


Awards and Recognitions

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2008). Research Foundation of SUNY, The Center for Development of Human Services, College Relations Group, "UB Faculty Recognition" for appreciation and outstanding research performance to support the mandated NYS training for human services employees in the child welfare system for the Office of Children and Families under the direction of Commissioner Gladys Carrion, NYS Governor's Office.


Selected Presentations (Recent)

Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Grella, S. (2010). Reading Recovery and the RtI model: Creating neurologically distinct groups. APA, San Diego California.

Chen, R., Rao, H.R., Sharman, R., Upadhyaya, S., Cook-Cottone, C. (2010) Examination of Emergency Response from Knowledge and Psychology Perspectives, the 7th International Conference on Information Systems for Crisis Response and Management, Seattle, WA, May 2-5, 2010

Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2009). Symposium: Neuropsychological Perspectives on the Treatment of the Female Client. APA. Toronto, ON.

Cook-Cottone, C., & Foote, C.J. (2008). High Need Urban Field Experiences. Paper accepted for presentation to the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. New Orleans, LA.

Kim, M., Rao, H. R., Cook-Cottone, C. P., Sharman, R., & Upadhyaya, S. (2008). An investigation of factors affecting effective emergency management during the 2006 October storm in Buffalo: Research-in-progress. Proceedings of the 2008 National Science Foundation Engineering Research and Innovation Conference. Knoxville, TN

Chen, R., Sharman, R., Rao, H., Upadhyaya,S. J., & Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2007, December 9). Organizational Coordination in Extreme Events: A Case Study of Incident Response for October '06 Snowstorm in Western New York. The Fifth Pre-ICIS SIG DSS Workshop, Montreal, Canada

Tarquin, K., & Cook-Cottone, C. P. (2007, March 29). The relationship among aspects of student alienation and self-concept. A paper presented at the Annual Conference of the National Association of School Psychologists. New York, NY.

Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Beck, M. (2006, June 18). Group treatment of eating disorders: A constructivist integration of mind and body strategies. A workshop presented at the Annual New York Association for Specialists in Group Work. Buffalo, NY.

Scime, M., Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Kane. L. (2006, March 30). A controlled study of a school-
based group prevention of eating disorders. A paper presented at the Annual Conference of the National Association of School Psychologists. Anaheim, CA.

Dutt-Doner, K, Cook-Cottone, C. P., & Allen, S (2005, April). Improving classroom instruction: Understanding the developmental nature of analyzing primary source documents. A paper presented at the American Educational Research Association (AREA) Annual meeting. Montreal, Canada.